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World Market Coupon; 30% Off (some exclusions apply, food 10% off ) + free shipping on $75+ or Store pickup where available

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World Market Coupon; 30% Off (some exclusions apply, food 10% off ) + free shipping on $75+ or Store pickup where available

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Cost Plus World Market is offering 30% off Sitewide (some exclusions apply) w/ promo code FRIENDSFAM. Select free store pickup where applicable, otherwise shipping is free on $75+ orders (surcharges may apply). Thanks daisybeetle

Note, offer includes Sale Items. Food & beverages are excluded from the 30% off discount, however they are discounted by 10%.
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1 day ago
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Hulu finally catches up with Netflix and Amazon, offers video downloads

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Closeup photo smart phone with Hulu app.

Enlarge / The downloadable content page in the iOS Hulu app. (credit: Hulu)

For the first time, Hulu will allow users to download episodes for offline viewing. The feature is available today for iOS users who have subscribed to Hulu's ad-free on-demand tier.

Users will be able to download as many as 25 videos on up to five unique devices. Unwatched downloads will remain available offline for 30 days. If users begin watching a video, it will only remain available for two days. But in either case, users will be able to renew the license by going online again, provided the episode or film has not left Hulu since they first downloaded it.

Hulu rivals Netflix and Amazon have long offered this feature, with similar terms for download limits and license renewals. Hulu may have faced a more difficult time rolling it out, not because of technical limitations or lack of will but because of the complexities surrounding content that is currently airing on broadcast networks, which is Hulu's primary focus. By contrast, most non-original Netflix and Amazon content is backlog content.

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6 days ago
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BBC drops first trailer for new adaptation of H.G. Wells’ War of the Worlds

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Martians invade Earth in The War of the Worlds, a new BBC adaptation of the H.G. Wells novel.

The BBC dropped the first trailer for its upcoming adaptation of the classic H.G. Wells science fiction novel The War of the Worlds. The three-part miniseries is set in Edwardian England—just a few years after Wells published his novel—and it looks like it will be a fairly faithful treatment of the source material, as the people of Earth fight to survive in the face of a Martian invasion.

(Spoilers for the 1897 novel below.)

First serialized in 1897, The War of the Worlds was published as a book the following year and has remained in print ever since. Told from the perspective of an unnamed narrator, the story opens with astronomers on Earth observing what appear to be explosions on the surface of Mars through their telescopes. Soon after, a meteor falls to Earth, which turns out to be a capsule housing large, tentacled aliens. The creatures do not come in peace; instead, they use their tripod fighting machines to destroy much of the town of Woking and its surroundings with their heat rays and poisonous black smoke.

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6 days ago
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Email signature ruling 'cost seller £25,000'

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A High Court judge rules an auto-signature at the end of an email makes it legally binding.
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7 days ago
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EU nations can force Facebook to remove content worldwide, court rules

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A Facebook logo in front of an EU flag in this photo illustration on November 20, 2017.

Enlarge / A Facebook logo in front of an EU flag in this photo illustration on November 20, 2017. (credit: Jaap Arriens | NurPhoto | Getty)

Europe's highest court issued a controversial ruling Thursday with the potential to have staggeringly large implications worldwide. The Court of Justice of the European Union held that Facebook and other social platforms are not only obligated to proactively identify unlawful content but also to block it worldwide if a single country's authorities demand it.

The ruling (PDF) stems from a case that began in Austria three years ago. A Facebook user posted comments about an Austrian politician, Eva Glawischnig-Piesczek, that Austrian courts found to be illegally defamatory. Glawischnig-Piesczek in 2016 wrote to Facebook Ireland, the company's EU headquarters, asking the company to delete the comments and limit access to them globally. Facebook refused, Glawischnig-Piesczek sued, and the results of the years of legal wrangling are out today.

A service is not liable for information it's hosting "if it has no knowledge of its illegal nature or if it acts expeditiously to remove or disable access" to the illegal content as soon as it becomes aware of it, the court said; the United States operates under a similar standard. The EU's directive on electronic commerce also "prohibits any requirement for the host provider," meaning a company such as Facebook, "to monitor generally information which it stores or to seek actively facts or circumstances indicating illegal activity," the court said.

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scm7sc
7 days ago
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Napster had the same argument so this shouldn't be a shock to Facebook
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Plate tectonics runs deeper than we thought

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Þingvellir or Thingvellir, is a national park in Southwestern Iceland, about 40km northeast of Iceland's capital, Reykjavík. It's a site of geological significance, as the visuals may indicate.

Enlarge / Þingvellir or Thingvellir, is a national park in Southwestern Iceland, about 40km northeast of Iceland's capital, Reykjavík. It's a site of geological significance, as the visuals may indicate. (credit: Ray Wise/Getty Images)

It’s right there in the name: “plate tectonics.” Geology’s organizing theory hinges on plates—thin, interlocking pieces of Earth’s rocky skin. Plates’ movements explain earthquakes, volcanoes, mountains, the formation of mineral resources, a habitable climate, and much else. They’re part of the engine that drags carbon from the atmosphere down into Earth’s mantle, preventing a runaway greenhouse climate like Venus. Their recycling through the mantle helps to release heat from Earth’s liquid metal core, making it churn and generate a magnetic field to protect our atmosphere from erosion by the solar wind.

The name may not have changed, but today the theory is in the midst of an upgrade to include a deeper level—both in our understanding and in its depth in our planet. “There is a huge transformation,” says Thorsten Becker, the distinguished chair in geophysics at the University of Texas at Austin. “Where we say: ‘plate tectonics’ now, we might mean something that’s entirely different than the 1970s.”

Plate Tectonics emerged in the late1960s when geologists realized that plates moving on Earth’s surface at fingernail-growth speeds side-swipe each other at some places (like California) and converge at others (like Japan). When they converge, one plate plunges down into Earth’s mantle under the other plate, but what happened to it deeper in the mantle remained a mystery for most of the 20th century. Like an ancient map labeled “here be dragons,” knowledge of the mantle remained skin-deep except for its major boundaries.

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8 days ago
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